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20121202
20121210
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MSNBCW 3
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2012 6:00pm PST
the whole thing. like the crew of apollo 8, who took this picture commonly known as earth rise from the window of the craft as they operatored the moon in 1968. unfortunately, nearly half the earth was in shadow. an unmanned soviet spacecraft called zan 7 got this shot during a lunar fly buy. i guess you would call that a gibbon thes earth. fully lit by the sun. it is probably a shot you have seen so often you don't think how amazing it is. it was nicknamed the blue marble and it was taken by one of the astronaut astronauts on board, apollo 17. apollo 17 launched 40 years ago today, december 17, 1972. it was a night launch, aiming for littoral valley. gene certain non, harrison jack schmidt and ron evans aboard. apollo 17 launched at night, and when they landed three days later, the sun was behind them. and so that particular launch trajectory put a fully formed beautifully lit earth in the window of the command module at a time when the astronauts really should have been too busy to look at it. here is how al rainer, who could wrote the movie apollo 13 describes what happened. quot
FOX News
Dec 8, 2012 7:30am PST
. >> well, we thought our chances were 10 percent. >> apollo 13 commander thinking one out of 10 chances of surviving that. isn't that out of this world? >> and you know what else is stock picks from our shooting stars. none of them heroes, but they are all good friends. >> the space program, for america. liquiify national gas is huge . the company will do extraordinary well because of it cheniere. >> i agree with you about natural gas in general. but i rather have companies that are making money >> what is making money. >> i think boring is it better. >> hey, i built a crire on it. >> it is it a three percent dividend yield as walgreen is, it is a good idea. >> ben? >> super competive field. it is a
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2012 7:00am PST
of dollars from apollo, you can do it for less money now. but you keep the dollars going for new technologies, things that are harder to do, things that we couldn't do in the '60s and '70s, and '80s and build some of these new boosters. then you will do what nasa perhaps always intended to do, go beyond the edge and create a base of technology that someone else can come by and do space taxis to orbit or to the moon and private access. that is a sign of what they should be doing in the future, which is keep pushing new technologies, keep the funding high enough to keep the right people working there. >> that's a key, isn't it, jim? i mean, it was kind of a cool thing. i mean, when you got into space engineering, i mean, if you told somebody you worked at nasa or for heaven's sake, you were an astronaut, it was a really cool job. is the problem now that space travel and nasa isn't so cool anymore? how do you keep that moving forward? >> it's a problem around the world. the u.s. does not have that problem. the best and brightest still want to come work on the space program, either for nasa or ot
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)